WORLD STROKE DAY- OCT 29th 2020

A stroke can happen to anyone, at anytime, anywhere. #1in4 adults will have a stroke in their lifetime.Today stroke is the leading cause of disability worldwide and the second leading cause of death, but almost all strokes could be preventable.

More about stroke World Stroke Day 2020 

  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding speech.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance, or lack of coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

PREVENTION

Disabilities from a stroke?

  • Paralysis or problems controlling movement (motor control)
  •   Sensory disturbances, including pain
  • Problems using or understanding language (aphasia)
  •   Problems with thinking and memory
  • Emotional disturbances

    STROKE REHABILITATION
  • The goals of rehabilitation are to optimize how the person functions after a stroke and the level of independence, and to achieve the best possible quality of life.
  • Rehabilitation helps to protect the individual from developing new medical problems, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, injury due to fall, or a clot formation in large veins.

1.  COGNITIVE FUNCTION REHAB

2.COMMUNICATION SKILL REHAB

3.EMOTIONAL SUPPORT

4. Offer swallowing therapy at least 3 times a week to people with dysphagia after stroke who are able to participate, for as long as they continue to make functional gains. Swallowing therapy could include compensatory strategies, exercises and postural advice.

5.Movement – Person with movement difficulties after stroke requires physiotherapy followed by fitness training, strength training, repetitive task training for both upper limb and lower limb

ROLE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY IN STROKE REHABILITATION

From 24hours after a strokephysiotherapists begin rehabilitation in short frequent spells, focused on the requirement of the patient to help them to regain movement and relearn everyday activities. At least 45 minutes of each relevant stroke rehabilitation therapy for a minimum of 5 days per week to people who have the ability to participate.

  • Therapeutic positioning aims to reduce skin damage, limb swelling, shoulder pain or subluxation, and discomfort, and maximise function and maintain soft tissue length.
  • Early mobilization aims to reduce the time that elapses between stroke and the first time the patient leaves the bed, increasing the amount of physical activity that the patient engages in outside of bed. Early mobilisation (e.g. activities such as sitting out of bed, transfers, standing and walking depends on patients ability) aims to minimise the risk of the complications of immobility and improve functional recovery
  • Balancing and co-ordination exercises
  • Mobility and gait training
  • Strength training using weights
  • Provide orthotics like splints after assessing the patient.
  • Electrical stimulation to regain muscle power
  • Cardio respiratory training such as treadmill walk